U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The cleanup for part of an East Chicago, Indiana toxic waste site will cost nearly four times more than originally expected. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which oversees the site’s cleanup, will open an opportunity for public comments Monday, Dec. 18.

The EPA initially estimated cleanup for the residential area of the USS Lead Superfund site would cost $23 million. But, a new agency report says the estimate should be closer to $85 million.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will accelerate cleanup of 21 toxic waste sites across the country, including a lead- and arsenic-contaminated site in East Chicago, Indiana.

The EPA wants to expedite soil cleanup and finalize a plan for what to do with a now-abandoned public housing complex after it’s demolished at the USS Lead site in the northwest Indiana city.

Attorney David Chizewer says it’s not immediately clear if that’s helpful.

Michigan City Area Schools

Today:  We talk to Michigan City Area Schools Superintendent Barbara Eason-Watkins about the school district's "1:1" (one-student, one-device) high tech expansion program that includes Chromebook computers for students.  The program, supported by grants from the community and other sources, gives Michigan City students a chance to organize and enhance their work and stay engaged through "blended learning": the process of combining digital and traditional learning.  The program's picked up another "Innovators Award" for the school district from the Society of Innovators in Northwest Indiana

Lear Corporation

Today is "Reporter Roundtable" Thursday, where we bring in reporters (and editors) from northwest Indiana area media to talk about their stories this week.  We have Ed Bierschenk, Bill Dolan and Investigative Editor Marc Chase from the "Times" and "Chicago Tribune" reporter Michael Hawthorne.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from Wikipedia

On this Reporters Roundtable Thursday, we find out more about the major news stories of the week from the reporters who covered them.  With us in the studio is Post-Tribune reporter Javonte Anderson and by phone are his Post-Tribune colleagues Carrie Napoleon and Greg Tejeda and -- from the LaPorte Herald-Argus and Michigan City News-Dispatch -- reporter Jon Gard.  

Figg Bridge Partners

Today: It's Reporters Roundtable, when we ask members of the northwest Indiana and Indiana media to talk about the stories they worked on this week.  On this edition of the Roundtable are Greg Tejeda of the Post-Tribune, Lakeshore Public Radio's Steven Lattimore, Indiana Public Broadcasting's Eric Weddle and INside Indiana Business host Andy Ober.

Indiana To Begin Testing For Lead In Public School Water

May 30, 2017

State officials plan to investigate the drinking water of over 700 Indiana public schools for lead contamination this summer. Officials will travel the state to collect samples from drinking fountains, kitchen sinks and other fixtures that provide drinking water across school campuses.

Water testing will be led by the environmental arm of the Indiana Finance Authority, which oversees state funds from the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

Supermarket News

Today: It is Reporters' Round Table day on "Regionally Speaking," as we call on local reporters who worked on some of the major stories of the week to review and talk about them. 

IPBS

Today: our first "Regionally Speaking" Reporters' Roundtable discussion of the big local stories of the week, including updates on the East Chicago lead-arsenic contamination cleanup and the impact of the contamination on the West Calumet Housing Project.  The EPA Secretary  and HUD Secretary will visit East Chicago to see first-hand the issues and the cleanup.  We also discuss the investigation into a leak of the chemical chromium-6 from a U.S. Steel waste outlet into Burns Waterway in Portage, just hundreds of feet from Lake Michigan.

Brandon Smith, IPBS

Today:  Northwest Indiana Times Statehouse reporter Dan Carden joins us for an update on what local legislators are working on, in the final days of the 2017 General Assembly session.

Today:   We revisit our conversation with Purdue University Northwest Chancellor Thomas Keon, on the Hammond and Westville campus unification effort that earned PNW an Innovator award from the Society  of Innovators of Northwest Indiana.

WalletHub.com analyst Jill Gonzalez talks about where Indiana stands on the latest Best and Worst State Taxpayer Return On Investment list.  It's about halfway in the pack, so to speak, of U.S. states' governments and how efficient they are on spending tax revenues.

Great Lakes Programs Slashed Under Trump Budget

Mar 24, 2017

 

The health of the Great Lakes is in danger, according to statewide lawmakers and environmental leaders, due to budget cuts proposed by President Donald Trump.

The Great Lakes are the world’s largest system of freshwater lakes and the federal government currently spends around $300 million protecting them. Under President Trump’s proposed budget, that spending would be reduced to $5 million.

U.S Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Indiana) says that money wasn’t being wasted.

 

East Chicago, Indiana, officials are worried about the future of lead contamination clean up in the city because of actions taken by the Trump Administration Tuesday.

The uncertainty comes after the administration temporarily suspended grants and contracts overseen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.