Lead Stories

Family Separation Is Trump's Immigration Policy. Here's Why He Won't Own It

President Trump and administration officials are walking a fine line on family separation at the border. They argue they don't like the policy, but that their hands are tied — and instead are pointing fingers at Congress to "fix" it. There may be good reason for that — the policy (and it is a Trump administration policy, despite the Homeland Security secretary's claims to the contrary) is unpopular. The president on Tuesday called on Congress to come up with a "third option": for the legal...

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Noblesville West Updates

Noblesville Announces Tightening School Safety As Parents Demand Accountability

Nearly three weeks after a student shot his teacher and classmate at a Noblesville middle school, district leaders Tuesday announced new building safety enhancements and increased mental health supports. Funding is in place for some items, but leaders say they must seek additional finances to cover current and future measures, including state and federal grants or possibly try a property-tax increase referendum on the November ballot. Officlas have not placed a total cost on the plan. The...

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Regionally Speaking With Chris Nolte

Purdue University Northwest

Regionally Speaking, Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Today: We ask Purdue University Northwest Chancellor's chief of staff Richard Rupp: What happens on both the Hammond and Westville campuses during the summer months, after spring commencement and the end of classes and before a new academic year begins? (You'll be surprised to learn that a lot happens.) We also offer another conversaton from the Welcome Project at Valparaiso University. The Welcome Projoect collects first-person stories and pairs them with intentional conversations to forge...

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2018 Midterm Elections

Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.), left, and Republican Senate candidate Mike Braun, right, don't agree on who's to blame for the Trump administration's family separation policy. (Photos courtesy of the U.S. Senate and the Indiana General Assembly)
Brandon Smith

Both the Democratic and Republican candidates in Indiana’s Senate race say the U.S. should not separate parents from their children at the border. But those candidates don’t agree on who’s to blame for that policy.

When Congress approved giving $380 million to states to bolster the security of their elections, state officials were caught off guard but extremely grateful. Elections are notoriously underfunded and haven't seen a windfall like this from the federal government in more than a decade.

But getting that money out to all the states, and then into the hands of localities that run the elections, with enough time to have a meaningful effect on the 2018 midterm elections is a difficult proposition.

Indiana Democrats Officially Nominate Statewide Ticket

Jun 16, 2018
Indiana Democrats running statewide in 2018: from left, Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.), Secretary of State candidate Jim Harper, State Auditor candidate Joselyn Whitticker, and State Treasurer candidate John Aguilera. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

The Indiana Democratic candidates for statewide office share a common theme: it’s time for an end to one-party rule in Hoosier state government.

Democratic delegates met in Indianapolis Saturday for their biannual party convention.

Each member of the Democratic statewide ticket emphasized the need to eliminate Republican control at the Statehouse. Or, as Treasurer candidate John Aguilera put it:

More on the 2018 Midterm Elections

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East Chicago Lead Contamination Crisis

EPA Officials Hear East Chicago Residents Concerns As Cleanup Starts Again This Spring

The Environmental Protection Agency visited East Chicago, Indiana, Saturday, to update residents on contamination cleanup. EPA Region 5 Administrator Cathy Stepp and U.S. EPA senior advisor Albert Kelly attended the briefing and listened to public comment. Residents heard updates from the on-site remediation coordinators and participated in, sometimes heated, Q&A sessions. Those comments were heard loud and clear, says Kelly. A resident asked Kelly to attend. Kelly says this is his sixth...

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NPR Annotations, Fact Checks, Live Feeds, & Transcripts

President Trump's Press Conference On North Korea Summit, Annotated

President Trump met with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un Tuesday in Singapore. The two signed a joint statement committing to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. After the summit, Trump spoke to reporters about the meeting and took questions. Following is a transcript of the press conference, provided by the White House, annotated by NPR reporters. ( Click here if annotation doesn't appear below.) Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Local, State, & National News

Inside the spotless industrial kitchen at Recovery Point, a long-term drug treatment facility in Charleston, W.Va., Tracy Jividen helps to cook three meals a day for the nearly 100 women she calls her sisters. This space is her domain, and the irony isn't lost on her: Last winter, she was stealing so she could eat.

Principal Mary Ann Hale dreads weekends.

By the time Fridays roll around, 74-year-old Hale, a principal at West Elementary School in McArthur, Ohio, is overcome with worry, wondering whether her students will survive the couple of days away from school.

Too many children in this part of Ohio's Appalachian country live in unstable homes with a parent facing addiction. For years, the community has struggled with opioids. Ohio had the second-highest number of drug overdose deaths per capita in 2016, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

President Trump and administration officials are walking a fine line on family separation at the border.

They argue they don't like the policy, but that their hands are tied — and instead are pointing fingers at Congress to "fix" it.

There may be good reason for that — the policy (and it is a Trump administration policy, despite the Homeland Security secretary's claims to the contrary) is unpopular.

White House deputy chief of staff Joe Hagin, who played a key role in organizing President Trump's Singapore summit with Kim Jong Un, is retiring.

The White House said Hagin will step down after serving in every GOP administration since Ronald Reagan's. His departure is expected next month.

Hagin led the U.S. team that managed logistics for last week's Trump-Kim meeting, winning praise from the president.

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