Statewide News

More than 700 Indiana students received a certificate of multilingual proficiency from the state, meaning the students are proficient in two languages.

The Department of Education awarded this certificate, and this is the first cohort of students receiving the recognition.

HIV/STD Conference Keeps Shapes Prevention Strategies

May 19, 2017

Health providers, public health leaders and other treatment professionals from around Indiana gathered in Indianapolis for the 2017 HIV/STD Update. The annual conference allows people working in and around the field of infectious disease to come together, hear from national and state leaders and shape strategy.

Medical director at the Bell Flower STD Clinic, Dr. Janet Arno, says the event can help keep the conversation updated.

Road construction season is underway, and after state lawmakers allocated more money for local roads, House Speaker Brian Bosma says communities should see a big season.

“We want them to start smelling asphalt in July,” Bosma said after unveiling the road funding package in April.

Indiana’s local communities will receive at least $200 million for roads and bridges in the state’s new infrastructure funding package.

Indiana Unemployment Rate Lowest Since Early 2001

May 19, 2017

The unemployment rate declined in April for the second consecutive month, down 0.3 of a percent to 3.6 percent. That’s the biggest single month drop since late 2010. And 3.6 percent is the lowest rate since February 2001.

But the Hoosier private sector lost 9,300 jobs last month. That’s the largest single month decline since June 2009. The losses were led by the manufacturing and private educational and health services sectors. And the private sector has now shed jobs four of the last five months.

A who’s-who of Midwest business leaders met in Indianapolis Thursday to talk about their stake in fixing updating the nation’s aging transportation system.

Many say Indiana’s plans for road repairs should stand as a national, multi-modal example.

Ports of Indiana CEO Rich Cooper, who helped host the roundtable discussion, says the state and national economies rely on more than ships and barges. Changes at one part of the system, he says, have huge ripple effects on the rest.

McCormick: ‘Concern’ 2 SBOE Seats Still Vacant

May 18, 2017

As two seats sit vacant on Indiana’s education policy-creating body, the state’s highest-ranking education official is concerned.

As Gary Community Schools prepares for a state-hired emergency manager to take control, the seat on the state education board that represents the district remains vacant.

The same goes for East Chicago Schools as it faces a lead contamination crisis in the community.

Planned Parenthood wants a court to halt portions of a new Indiana abortion law. It’s the fifth lawsuit over abortion legislation in seven years.

Indiana’s corn and soybean growers are getting seeds in the ground this week – but more rain on the way could put farmers in a difficult position.

As of Monday, 56 percent of the state’s projected corn crop and 23 percent of the projected soybean crop have been planted.


Indiana Center for Evaluation and Education Policy

A new study shows Indiana’s schools are segregated by race and income, something that’s true across the state.

The study comes from Indiana University’s Center for Evaluation & Education Policy, and focuses on how students from different races and economic backgrounds intersect.

Currently, 32 states have laws that set up guidelines for victims of some crimes to meet with the offenders. The precursor to these programs was established in Elkhart County in 1977. It serves around 800 cases annually.

The program is now threatened with a funding cut.

Many of the cases that go through the program look like Robert Perry’s. Not so long ago Perry was struggling with addiction and decided to rob a store.

Friday marked the official end to Indianapolis-based Anthem’s bid to merge with Cigna, and the second time in recent months a major health insurance merger has failed.

It underscores the uphill regulatory battle that big health insurers face in trying to join forces.

Anti-trust officials blocked mergers between Humana and Aetna, and Anthem and Cigna this year. Those four have something in common: they’re among their industry’s biggest, top-earning companies.

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Peter Organisciak / https://www.flickr.com/photos/organisciak/525843127

At least one Indiana water company is warning its customers to be mindful of the chemicals they put on their lawns.

Indiana American Water issued a press release saying recent heavy rains have made it more likely that pesticides and other chemicals would flow from urban lawns into municipal sewer systems.

Girls of color are much more likely than white girls to be suspended from Indiana schools and schools nationwide, according to a new report.

Indiana schools suspend about one in nine black girls, one in 29 Latina girls and one in 50 white girls, according to the report from the National Women’s Law Center.

ISDH Launches County Profiles To Fight Opioid Epidemic

May 15, 2017

A new tool from the Indiana State Department of Health aims to help counties determine how best to respond to the opioid epidemic. Those profiles, released Monday, offer a view of how the opioid epidemic is impacting Indiana communities, county by county.

ISDH deputy commissioner Pam Pontones says the information is not meant to rank counties or serve as a comparison but rather to give counties a snapshot of their risks and trends.

On this edition of "Lakeshore Update," host Sara Dykstra explains how President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey might impact a state senate race in 2018, we'll get the latest on a lawsuit involving the Gary-Chicago International Airport, and we'll hear from John Cain with "Eye on the Arts."

INDIANA - Starting on May 12th Region residents, and anyone driving through Northwest Indiana had better be diligent about wearing their seat belt while driving, because anyone who doesn't could get a ticket.

The long failing Hoosier Academies Virtual School avoided closure from the State Board of Education at a hearing Wednesday.

Instead, the board approved a lesser punishment – a cut back on the number of students who can enroll this fall.

The online school became eligible for state sanctions, including shutdown, in early 2015. But it’s taken more than two years and three additional state education board meetings for the members to decide to take action.

Voucher Schools Lose Bid For Waivers Under New Law

May 10, 2017

The Indiana State Board of Education denied waivers for three voucher-accepting private schools to speed up their eligibility to continue to accept voucher students.

A private school that receives D or F school grades for two or more consecutive years is no longer eligible to accept students who use vouchers to pay for tuition.

Indiana University announced a $55 million research partnership Wednesday.

The Prepared for Environmental Change initiative aims to find actionable solutions to environmental threats facing Indiana businesses and communities.

Indiana University President Michael McRobbie says Hoosiers must prepare for these already ongoing threats.

“The failure to understand, predict, and adapt to environmental change could threaten the vitality of Hoosier business, agriculture, jobs, and physical well-being,” McRobbie says.

6 Questions To Ask About The Purdue-Kaplan Deal

May 9, 2017

So, there’s been some big news going around the higher education world this past week. In a nutshell: Indiana’s Purdue University will acquire the for-profit Kaplan University, which operates primarily online.

Since this news broke, there’s been plenty of speculation about what it means when a public research university acquires a for-profit entity: Is this a way for a public research university to reach more students? Is this a way that a for-profit college can operate in “stealth mode?”

We take a look at the biggest questions surrounding the move:

President Donald Trump nominated a University of Notre Dame law professor to fill a vacancy on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Professor Amy Coney Barrett was part of a round of federal judgeship nominations the Trump administration announced.

Barrett, a Notre Dame law school graduate, has been a professor at the private Indiana university since 2002. She formerly clerked for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

Law school dean Nell Jessup Newton calls Barrett an “outstanding professor, scholar, and colleague.”

Recent Rains Lift Some Spirits, Dampen Others

May 9, 2017
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Wabash River Enhancement Corp.

National Weather Service officials say all the rain clouds this month may hold a silver lining for Indiana.

NWS hydrologist Al Shipe says this year was shaping up similarly to the most recent drought year of 2012 – until recently.

Attorney General Curtis Hill will continue to live in the Indianapolis area despite the repeal of a law requiring him to do so.

Senate Bill 400 changed two words in the Indiana code: “at Indianapolis” became “in Indiana.” That refers to where the attorney general is required to live.

A small group gathered to protest outside the offices of U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) in after the U.S. House of Representatives sent the Affordable Care Act’s replacement to the U.S. Senate.

The Women’s March Indiana Chapter gathered supporters in downtown Indianapolis to speak out against the plan to repeal and replace Obamacare and support women’s healthcare.

Nancy Hanson has been showing up at Young’s office every week for months. She says she’s worried about the Republican reform bill called the American Health Care Act or AHCA.

Hoosier Academies Virtual School was near the brink of closure by the Indiana State Board of Education in March 2015 when the board opted for a one-year delay on casting a verdict.

Then, there was a call for another delay.

Now, more than two years since Indiana’s first online charter school became eligible for state intervention due to chronic failure, the state board will consider whether to shutter it or take a less severe type of intervention during a meeting Wednesday in Evansville.

Many supporters of Planned Parenthood rallied Friday in response to the U.S. House of Representatives passing the American Health Care Act (AHCA). Some Hoosiers say it will decrease general healthcare access for low-income residents.

An event outside of U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks office in Carmel was one of many held across the nation. A few dozen supporters crowded the halls outside her office and police were called at the request of a building manager who was worried about a fire hazard.

On this week's "Lakeshore Update" we'll get an update from Nick Janzen on the struggles residents continue to face in East Chicago, what Governor Holcomb and Senator Melton think of their first sessions, Sharon Jackson reports that Mt. Baldy will finally re-open, and we'll get the latest from host Sara Dykstra on four school referendums in the Region.

Supporters Vow To Resurrect Airbnb Bill Next Session

May 5, 2017

Supporters of legislation stopping locals from banning short-term rentals like Airbnb say they’ll be back next session after the bill failed in 2017.

And even its opponents are ready to work on the measure again.

Katherine Peraza poses with her her 3-month-old son. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
(Jill Sheridan/IPB News)

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