Local News

NWI Business Quarterly

Today: we find out from Lakeshore Public Radio's Megan Fernandez why companies from outside Indiana are so interested in locating (or relocating) into Lake and Porter Counties.  Megan talked to, among other people, Mayors Jon Costas of Valparaiso and Tom McDermott Jr. of Hammond.

We meet and talk with the local chapter president of the Freedom Riders of Indiana, "Boone" Duvall, to learn more about this charitable organization -- its mission and goals -- and who benefits from its fundraising events, like one coming up on August 26th.

Pinnacle Treatment Centers / The Mooney Group

In the "war on drugs," we hear the raw data and statistics about deaths and the like, and about the lack of options for those addicted and their loved ones.  But there are also men and women who offer healing and hope -- who are an inspiration to all of us. 

Indiana Black Legislative Caucus

Today:  the final Town Hall meeting in the statewide series of meetings set up by the Indiana Black Legislative Caucus is coming up this Saturday at Indiana University Northwest in Gary, so we bring back our conversation with State Senator Eddie Melton (D-Gary) and his Caucus colleague, State Senator Greg Taylor (D-Indianapolis). They talk about the entire Town Hall series and the Caucus' intentions for the comments they hear in creating new legislation.

activerain.com

Recently Northwest Indiana has landed three big Illinois companies. One of Hammond's biggest employer’s Lear is building a new $30 million investment into the City of Hammond. They are building a new plant that will bring up to 750 jobs. The City of Gary landed a new $35 million production from Illinois steel that will bring up to 100 new jobs. And an unnamed company from Chicago's western suburbs plans to relocate from Illinois to the East Chicago, the manufacturer will hire about 500 workers at an average salary of $55,000 a year.

Indiana says it wants to help train train more Hoosier workers for in-demand jobs. Two grant programs will help cover tuition for career certificates and training costs for employers in what the state calls “high-demand” areas.

The legislature approved $10 million apiece over two years for the two programs – the Workforce Ready Grant and the Employer Training Grant.

AP

Today: "South Bend Tribune" political writer and columnist Jack Colwell joins us to talk about his latest column, also found on "Howey Politics Indiana," about what one author noted -- from an actual pre-campaign event in 2011 --  how seriously President Donald Trump takes everything, even jokes aimed in his direction.

Indiana Economic Digest

Today:  It's Reporters Roundtable on "Regionally Speaking," when we ask reporters in northwest Indiana media to talk about their stories they researched and wrote for their online and print publications.  This edition features "Times of Northwest Indiana" reporters Giles Bruce and Sarah Reese, Greg Tejeda from the "Post-Tribune" and Jon Gard of the LaPorte "Herald-Argus" and Michigan City "News-Dispatch."

NWI Business Quarterly

Today:  a conversation with Paul Boardman, one of several candidates who are asking a Republican Party caucus in LaPorte this coming Friday evening to be selected as Mayor for the two-plus years remaining in Blair Milo's term of office.  Milo recently joined the Holcomb administration and stepped down as Mayor.  Boardman talks about his concerns about the economic future of LaPorte and other issues.

Indiana Law Could Ruin Solar's Future At Schools

Aug 9, 2017

More groups – from utilities to businesses and even schools — are investing in solar energy. Its popularity continues to go up, while costs go down. But a law passed earlier this year by the Indiana General Assembly could spell trouble for the industry.

Take, for example, Tri-Creek School Corporation’s solar experiment.

Amtrak

Today:  Steve Coxhead, the president of the Indiana Passenger Rail Alliance, joins us to talk about concerns about late trains on Amtrak's "Hoosier State passenger service between Indianapolis and Chicago.  The national rail provider says only one in three Indianapolis-bound trains arrived on-time in June, a change from past months  Coxhead says there are problems on CSX, the freight line that provides the rails for both the "Hoosier State" and the Indiana "Cardinal" passenger routes. 

U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson says officials will work to help displaced families from a lead-contaminated public housing complex in East Chicago.

Carson met privately Monday with some residents and local lawmakers near the now-empty West Calumet Housing Complex. Gov. Eric Holcomb, Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch, U.S. Rep. Pete Visclosky, U.S. Sens. Joe Donnelly and Todd Young, and East Chicago Mayor Anthony Copeland joined the discussion.

makingparadise.com / makingparadise.com

VALPARAISO - Seven friends loved their city so much, they wanted to give something unique back to it.  So they decided to make a movie about Valparaiso, which they say is a love story to the town.  

The film, "Making Paradise."​ shows the dynamic between the creators, director, Jim Jano Janesheski, film business manager Steve Antonetti, producer Tim Daly, Valparaiso legend and idea guy Bill Wellman, Jason Monroe, local business owner and film promoter Carlos Rivero and executive producer and Director of Photography Brad Cavanaugh.  

Annie Ropeik, IPBS

Today:   a conversation with northwest Indiana community activist Ruth Needleman, on a visit by U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Ben Carson and other political leaders to East Chicago, for an update briefing on the city's lead contamination issues and how they're being addressed.  Ruth also talks about the question of whether an Illinois steel company's move to Gary will mean more local jobs.

chalkbeat.org

 The Hammond Teacher’s Federation and Hammond school district hosted the first of a series of events intended to help Latino Hoosiers understand immigration policy.

Community leaders from northwest Indiana helped lead the conference that drew more than 400 attendees.

Democratic State Senator Frank Mrvan says workshops at the event are the first step to understanding immigration’s big picture.

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Barbara Anguiano / WVPE

The Hammond Teacher’s Federation and Hammond school district hosted the first of a series of events intended to help Latino Hoosiers understand immigration policy.

Community leaders from northwest Indiana helped lead the conference that drew more than 400 attendees.

Democratic State Senator Frank Mrvan says workshops at the event are the first step to understanding immigration’s big picture.

Lakeshore Public Media

On this edition of "Lakeshore Update" you'll hear about Gary's Powers and Sons Construction from Steven Lattimore. Nick Janzen reports on how environment groups say that EPA cuts will damage Hoosier health, and Chris Nolte talks with Senator Melton about the new Gary School Corporation's emergency manager.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson will sit down with state lawmakers at East Chicago’s lead-contaminated public housing complex Monday.

The visit comes five months after three Indiana congressmen invited Carson to the USS Lead Superfund site, which is contaminated with high levels of lead and arsenic from old factories.

 

A Gary company is being recognized for longevity and success. The Powers and Sons Construction company is being recognized by Black Enterprise Magazine as the 2017 company of the year. Steven Lattimore take look at the Gary company being highlighted last the best in the country.

 

Indiana’s three ports had their second-best start to the year ever in 2017.

Burns Harbor, Mt. Vernon and Jeffersonville moved 19 percent more cargo in the first six months of this year than at the same time in 2016 – 5.7 million tons overall.

Almost two-thirds of that went through the southwest port of Mt. Vernon, in the form of bulk cargoes – things like coal, ethanol, fertilizer and minerals, which get transferred between railcars, river barges and trucks.

Indiana stands to lose out if Congress approves proposed budget cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency, says environmentalists, scientists, EPA staffers, and Indiana residents.

The cuts could affect drinking water infrastructure, burden the state’s environmental regulatory agency, and hinder efforts to clean up industrial toxic waste sites.

Lakeshore Public Media

State Senator Eddie Melton (D-Gary) was on "Regionally Speaking" on Wednesday to talk about the upcoming Indiana Black Legislative Caucus Town Hall meeting on August 19th at I.U. Northwest in Gary.  But -- while we had him in the studio --we asked him for his thoughts about the appointment of an emergency manager for the fiscally- and academically-troubled Gary Community School Corp. 

The Senator introduced a bill last General Assembly session, which became law, calling for the procedure to select the emergency manager.

Photo Provided

Today:  an extended conversation with State Senator Eddie Melton (D-Gary) and State Senator Greg Taylor (D-Indianapolis) about the series of Indiana Black Legislative Caucus statewide Town Hall meetings, ending in Gary on August 19th in the Bergland Auditorium at the Savannah Center of Indiana University Northwest in Gary.  Both Melton and Taylor have attended some of the other Town Hall meetings in other Hoosier cities.

AP-Think Progress website

Miguel Molina is a northwest Indiana resident who is involved in "The People's Voice" project -- a statewide project with a mission to "transform Indiana into a state that represents the wishes of all Hoosiers through civic engagement." 

AP-Think Progress website

Today:  We meet and talk with Miguel Molina, a northwest Indiana resident who is involved in "The People's Voice" project -- a statewide project with a mission to "transform Indiana into a state that represents the wishes of all Hoosiers through civic engagement." 

Miguel and others in northern Indiana are working to give what are called "low propensity voters" a voice in the community through voter education and voter registration programs ahead of the 2018 election cycle.

Valporaiso-The deadly accident at the Ohio State  As Lake Shore Public Radio's Steven Lattimore Reports Fair operators want the Fair to be safe because without out it they are out of business. We talked to a carnival operator who has been at it for thirty years.

Valporaiso-After the deadly accident at the Ohio State Fair we wanted to take a look at saftey at our local State Fair's. Lakeshore Public Radio's Steven Lattimore went to the Porter County Fair to get reaction and insight about how State Fair operators keep State Fair's safe.

      

On this edition of the podcast we'll hear about the "Summer Lunch Bus" program from Steven Lattimore. Jill Sheridan reports on a Northwest Indiana Planned Parenthood clinic that has halted abortions because of a state law that involves doctors’ admitting privileges. Brandon Smith reports on Governor Eric Holcomb about the federal healthcare reform and it's impact on the state, and Chris Nolte lets you know how to avoid taking on extra debt to pay for a summer vacation. All of that and more, on this edition of Lakeshore Update.

A national fair housing group says Deutsche Bank and two other businesses are less likely to maintain foreclosed, bank-owned homes in majority-black areas of 30 cities, including Indianapolis and Gary.

A new version of a federal complaint, out this week, expands the investigation.

The National Fair Housing Alliance and 19 local organizations first filed a complaint with the Department of Housing and Urban Development against Deutsche Bank in 2014.

Lear Corporation

Today is "Reporter Roundtable" Thursday, where we bring in reporters (and editors) from northwest Indiana area media to talk about their stories this week.  We have Ed Bierschenk, Bill Dolan and Investigative Editor Marc Chase from the "Times" and "Chicago Tribune" reporter Michael Hawthorne.

Blood, Lead & Soil: A Year In East Chicago

Jul 26, 2017

One year ago, East Chicago Mayor Anthony Copeland told residents of the West Calumet Housing Complex they had to move out because of lead and arsenic contamination.

The announcement sparked a year of frantic action from residents, public officials, activists, and lawyers that’s still ongoing.

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