Health

Eli Lilly CEO Dave Ricks announces new diabetes pilot project. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Jill Sheridan

A new partnership aims to reduce diabetes in three neighborhoods in Indianapolis where the rates of the disease are as high as 17 percent. The effort builds on work Eli Lilly and Company has developed in Mexico, South Africa and India.

Eli Lilly and Company CEO Dave Ricks says the $7 million, five-year effort will focus on three communities in Indianapolis. 

Indiana State Of Our Health Tour Kicks Off

Apr 13, 2018
Community Health Network CEO and Alliance Chairman Bryan Mills addresses the State of Our Health summit in Indianapolis. (Alliance for a Healthier Indiana)
Jill Sheridan

The inaugural Indiana State of Our Health Summit was held in Indianapolis.  The event also kicked off a statewide tour to raise awareness about Indiana’s poor health rankings.

Health Needs Survey Headed To Hoosiers

Apr 2, 2018
(Pixabay)
Jill Sheridan

Many Hospital systems around the state have partnered to survey more than 80,000 households about their healthcare needs. The survey starts this week and Community Health Network hopes it can help improve service and identify factors that lead to poor health.

The My Community Health Needs Assessment survey will target communities across 39 counties in Indiana. 

A new Indiana law requires school coaches to undergo training for heat-related medical issues. (U.S. Air Force)
Brandon Smith

A new Indiana law requires school coaches to undergo training for heat-related medical issues. The measure’s author says it’s the “last piece of the puzzle” to help coaches protect student athletes’ health.

Indiana Alzheimer's Cases And Costs Rise

Mar 21, 2018
Lyle Bass received an early Alzheimer's diagnosis and has taken steps to improve his overall health and future care. (Alzheimer's Association of Greater Indiana)
Jill Sheridan

A new report finds Alzheimer’s deaths in Indiana are on the rise as well as related costs. 

A special part of the annual 2018 Alzheimer’s Facts and Figures report analyzes the personal and financial savings that an early diagnosis can bring. 

Disparity Among Indiana Counties Impacts Health

Mar 14, 2018

The ninth annual County Health Rankings report shows that where you live impacts a person’s health.  This year’s data also includes a look at how racial disparity plays into health across Indiana.

The report finds black people have lower life expectancy and quality of life than white or Asian people in Indiana.  The rankings account for measurements including healthy behaviors, access to care, social and economic factors and environment. 

Genomics Advances Identifies Unexpected Cancer 'Cure'

Feb 22, 2018

Genomic sequencing maps your DNA and doctors and scientists can use this information to find the best treatment for a specific person. Some potential treatments are not as invasive as traditional chemotherapy – in fact, one may already be in your medicine cabinet.

Indiana scientists are reporting encouraging success with this precision medicine. Dr. Milan Radovich is genomics scientist and co-director of the Indiana University Precision Genomics Group in Indianapolis.

About 11 percent of Hoosiers have diabetes and an estimated third of the state has pre-diabetes.  A new start-up company will breed a rare type of pig used to study diabetes treatments and look for a cure.

The new business partnership between Purdue University and Indiana University School of Medicine scientists will produce the Ossabaw pigs which are predisposed to diabetes.

Grant To Help Create Holistic Cancer Care

Feb 7, 2018

A new Indiana University School of Medicine program to holistically address a cancer patient’s needs has received a $14 million gift.

Supportive oncology provides extra layers of care for patients with cancer. Some studies show it can help prolong life. The grant from the Walther Cancer Foundation will enable the creation of a program to addresses not just the management of pain and symptoms but also psychological issues like anxiety or depression.

IU School of Medicine Dean Dr. Jay Hess says it’s a growing trend in cancer care.

While Indiana’s health ranking ticked up on a recent annual report, health leaders say there’s more work to be done. A new data tool that highlights specific issues may provide some insight into focus areas. The tool from the Alliance for a Healthier Indiana breaks down top health priorities by county.

Indiana Health Ranking Improves, Still Falls Short

Dec 21, 2017

The United Health Foundation’s annual state rankings are out. Indiana was ranked 38th in the country, up one spot from last year.

The analysis provides a benchmark for states and in Indiana does see improvements like drops in smoking rates and childhood poverty. Low health provider access continues to be an issue says Dr. Julia Daftari with United Health Care in Indiana.

Children in Indiana’s minority and immigrant populations often have a more difficult start in life according to the conclusions of the latest look at disparity in wellbeing for Hoosier kids.

About 20 percent of Indiana’s population identifies as African-American, Hispanic, Asian or another non-white race.

Indiana Youth Institute President Tami Silverman says a new report from the Annie E. Casey foundation finds children in these households are less likely to benefit from opportunities to grow and develop.

Donnelly Co-sponsors Bipartisan Bills Targeting Opioid Crisis

Oct 13, 2017

After introducing bipartisan legislation focused on the opioid epidemic, U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) participated in a walkthrough of The Willow Center in Brownsburg, and spoke to addiction recovery advocates about battling the epidemic.

“To everyone here, I want to tell you how grateful I am for your hard work,” Donnelly says. “It ties in with legislation I have, and it’s called Strengthening Addiction Treatment Workforce Act.”

CHIP Expires: What That Means For Hoosier Children

Oct 2, 2017

Congress let funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) expire over the weekend. The program that provides health insurance for nearly 100,000 Hoosier children has reserves to continue normal operations for now.

Jointly funded by the federal government and the states, CHIP has covered Hoosier children for 20 years.

The Affordable Care Act increased funding and brought the state’s expenses down. Covering Kids and Families public policy director Mark Fairchild says Indiana has rollover money that will help cover as federal funding goes away.

New Tool Calculates Cost Of Sleep Disorders

Sep 25, 2017

A new research tool calculates the cost of fatigue for workers. According to the National Safety Council or NSC, untreated sleep disorders play into millions in lost productivity and health care costs.

A new online calculator measures how lack of sleep and work are linked says NSC President and CEO Deborah Hersman.

“An employee with insomnia incurs at least $2,250 in excess health care cost each year and 11 lost days in productivity,” says Hersman.

A federal judge permanently struck down key portions of Indiana’s controversial 2016 anti-abortion bill.

Four Indiana counties that were in danger of having no insurance options for customers on the Affordable Care Act marketplace will have choices in 2018. Decatur, Jackson, Grant and Wayne Counties were at risk of having no providers next year after Anthem and MD Wise announced in June they would be leaving the market at the end of this year.

'Drive for our Lives' makes stop in South Bend

Aug 15, 2017
Ben Wikler, with the organization MoveOn, talks to a crowd at the Old Court House in South Bend. Mayor Pete Buttigieg and community health care advocates shared stories about the impact of the Affordable Care Act.
Barbara Anguiano / WVPE

A black RV wrapped with the slogan “Drive for Our Lives” parked outside of the Old Courthouse in South Bend. People gathered to hear stories about the importance of health care in the community and what advocates say is at stake if the Affordable Care Act is repealed and replaced.

Study: Food Outlet Proximity Not Related To Obesity

Aug 14, 2017

Researchers say a new study on whether a person’s proximity to certain food options causes obesity sets itself apart from past projects.

The findings indicate policies to reduce the number of fast food places or even open more markets will not likely reduce obesity. Indiana University environmental affairs professor Coady Wing was part of a team of researchers involved in a recent study.

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Heard & Smith Social Security Lawyers / https://www.flickr.com/photos/social-security-disability/

Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act could save the government money by causing fewer people to sign up for disability benefits, according to a new study from Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Indiana Health Commissioner Jerome Adams will become the country’s new surgeon general. Adams had bipartisan support from all senators present during the vote to confirm this week.

During a hearing, Adams said the opioid epidemic will be a main focus and changing prescribing practices is an important piece of that.

The latest assessment from the American Cancer Society details where Indiana lags and what progress it’s made in cancer fighting policies. The American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network annual progress report evaluates state legislative efforts.

American Cancer Society’s Bryan Hannon says failure to pass a cigarette tax increase last session set Indiana back in reducing smoking rates. But he says a modest funding increase for tobacco control programs was a step in the right direction.

 

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says the Senate will aim to prevent President Donald Trump from cutting off subsidies provided by the Affordable Care Act.

Through the Affordable Care Act, the government provides subsidies for co-pays and deductibles to help reduce the cost of insurance to consumers.

In an effort to respond to patients’ desires for speed and convenience, health networks are thinking small.

Microhospitals — which typically offer limited procedures and acute care services in a building with a significantly smaller footprint than traditional hospitals — have proven popular in other states, and a handful of the facilities are planned to open in Indiana.

A majority of former football players suffer from a degenerative brain condition. That’s according to a new study in the Journal of American Medicine. The condition is linked to concussions, but Indiana experts say it shouldn’t be cause for concern for all players.

Indiana University Health psychiatrist and neuroscience expert Thomas McAllister says the condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE is a type of dementia.

“And it’s been linked to people with certain head injuries,” says McAllister

Whooping Cough Cases On The Rise In Indiana

Jul 27, 2017

Twice the number of whooping cough cases have been recorded compared to this time last year and the Indiana State Department of Health is investigating. Outbreak supervisor Shawn Richards says

“One, is what we’re seeing normal?” says Richards. “Two, are there epidemiological links to other schools or states?”

For the first half of the year, 136 cases of pertussis or whooping cough have been reported compared to 66 in 2016.

The state says the increase could be due to more cases being reported or a waning vaccine. Richards says it could also be something else.

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Elliot Englert / for Side Effects Public Media

The public has weighed in on Indiana’s proposal to add a work requirement to its unique Medicaid program, the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0.  More than 40 people submitted their opinions to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as of July 18, showing overwhelming disapproval of the proposal.

Milk Bank Expands Services, Breastfeeding Support

Jul 18, 2017

The Milk Bank in Indiana will extend services beyond the donation of mothers’ breast milk, which has been its mission for nearly 12 years. In doing so, the organization can provide more ways to help mothers and infants in need.

The bank is the only donor human milk bank in Indiana with more 40 depot sites across the state where women can give their milk to help infants staying in hospitals.  An average 27,000 ounces of milk are dispensed every month at The Milk Bank.

The world’s only normal breast tissue bank marked its 10th year collecting and researching healthy women’s breast tissue last week.

Nearly 5,000 women have donated tissue to the Susan G. Komen Tissue Bank at Indiana University Simon Cancer Center since 2007, helping advance the search for a cure.

The bank was founded in response to a call from scientists for healthy tissue to aid in comparative research, explains Dr. Anna Maria Storniolo, the cofounder and executive director of the bank.

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