Handguns

Legislative leaders say no decisions have been made on whether lawmakers will advance gun regulation measures before session ends.

The House approved legislation Monday to eliminate the fee for Indiana’s lifetime handgun carry license.

Cash from gun carry permits typically goes to local law enforcement agency budgets. And some expressed concerns eliminating the fee would cut into police funding.

Rep. Tim Wesco (R-Osceola), the bill’s author, says the fee elimination doesn’t take effect until July 2019.

Committee Scales Back Bill To Eliminate Gun Permits

Jan 24, 2018

A bill that would have removed Indiana’s permit to carry a handgun was scaled back Wednesday.

A House Public Policy Committee approved the bill that keeps the handgun carry permit system but lifts some barriers. It extends a permit from four to five years and eliminates a fee for a lifetime permit.

Beth Sprunger with Moms Demand Action says since the permit stays, it’s a win.

“We feel pretty positive that they are not going to move forward with removing the permitting systems which was what our goal was here today,” says Sprunger.

A special study committee to consider the elimination Indiana’s handgun license requirements took more public testimony Thursday. It was the second of three scheduled meetings on the issue and reports the debate played out largely unchanged from the past several years.

Dozens of Hoosiers on either side of the debate showed up to testify about allowing people to carry guns in Indiana without a license.

 

Senate lawmakers approved legislation to allow legislative staffers to carry guns in the Statehouse.

A gun regulations bill was amended in the Senate to include language that would allow legislative employees to carry guns into the building. Currently, only police, judges and lawmakers are allowed to do that.

 

The House passed legislation to allow people protected by restraining orders to carry a handgun without a license for up to 60 days.

The vote came after an hour of passionate, sometimes emotional debate on the House floor.

Proponents – including Rep. Woody Burton (R-Whiteland) – say the measure ensures the government doesn’t stand in the way of victims of domestic violence protecting themselves.