2018 Indiana Legislative session

Andrean High School / Diocese of Gary, IN

Today:  on this Reporters Roundtable Thursday, we turn to Meredith Colias-Pete with the "Post-Tribune" for her stories, mainly about education and the General Assembly session, and to Jon Gard, who is a reporter for the LaPorte "Herald Argus" and the Michigan City "News Dispatch."

Indiana University-Purdue University Ft. Wayne

Today: a conversation with Andy Downs, the executive director of the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics in Fort Wayne, about the half-way point in the 2018 General Assembly session.   Bills that originated in the Indiana House had to pass by Monday to make it to the Senate, and Senate-originated bills had to jump through the same hurdles on Tuesday.  He talks about the House bills now headed up for Senate review.

IPB News

Today:  On this Reporters Roundtable Thursday, we bring on "Times of Northwest Indiana" reporters Dan Carden and Joseph Pete and "Post-Tribune" reporters Carrie Napoleon and Greg Tejeda to talk about the stories they covered and wrote for online and in print.

Temple University School of Law

Today:  we talk with Valparaiso University School of Law professor Jeremy Telman about this Thursday's 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture  on campus.  This year, the guest speaker is professor Henry Richardson III, from the Beasley School of Law at Temple University. He is a renowned expert on international law, and his insight into how it fits into today's world view will be ompared with Dr. King's own views. 

NUVO Magazine, Indianapolis

Today:   Hoosier Environmental Council executive director Jesse Kharbanda joins us to talk about the HEC's 2018 General Assembly policy priorities -- one of which isn't usually considered an environmental issue.  More information about them all is on the HEC website.

Carl Lisek of South Shore Clean Cities has the first episode of "Green Fleet Radio," a regular Wednesday feature on "Regionally Speaking."  He talks today with two Indiana Department of Environmental Management staffers:  Shawn Beals, the senior environmental manager and his colleague Ryan Clem.

Indiana lawmakers expect the General Assembly will continue to take incremental steps toward addressing the state’s water issues in 2018. The state needs billions in urgent water and wastewater infrastructure repairs.

Some Hoosiers want to see the legislature pass a large water infrastructure funding package, similar to one for roads approved during the 2017 session.

IGA.gov.IN

Today:   We revisit our conversation with Andy Downs of the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics in Fort Wayne about the major issues that could come up during the next General Assembly session that is  scheduled to begin January 3rd.

Ellen Szarletta with the Center for Urban and Regional Excellence at Indiana University Northwest joins us to talk about the topics for next month's "Senior University" courses offered on the Gary campus.

IN.gov

MERRILLVILLE - Lieutenant Governor Suzanne Crouch says Northwest Indiana has achieved great success and the Region is proof that the rest of the state can achieve that same success.

Crouch, who heads several state departments including the Office of Community and Rural Affairs and the Housing and Community Development Authority, came to Northwest Indiana on Thursday, November 30th to speak to the members of the Northwest Indiana Forum.  While here, she spoke with Lakeshore Public Radio Reporter/Show Host Sharon Jackson.
 

in.gov

MERRILLVILLE - Lieutenant Governor Suzanne Crouch was in the Region Thursday talking to community members about the departments she oversees, infrastructure improvements and the main priorities of the upcoming 2018 Indiana legislative session.
 

Indiana Democratic Party Caucus

One of northwest Indiana's veteran state legislators is calling the 2018 General Assembly session as his final session.

Dist. 3 Representative Charlie Brown (D-Gary) made the announcement on Monday, and he came on "Regionally Speaking" on Tuesday to talk about his decision not to seek re-election next year. 

Lawmakers Focus On STEM Education For 2018

Nov 22, 2017

Science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, has received a lot of attention at the statehouse lately, and that means the 2018 legislative session could bring major shifts for STEM education throughout the state.

House Education Committee chair Rep. Bob Behning (R-Indianapolis) says he plans to push for more math and science professionals teaching at the elementary school level.

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce emphasized education in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, in its plans for the 2018 legislative session. Chamber Vice President of Education, Workforce Development & Federal Relations, Caryl Auslander, says a major focus is on making computer science a prerequisite for high school graduation.

“While there are STEM requirements for high school graduation, there is not a computer science requirement,” Auslander says. “And we believe that needs to change.”

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Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

A group of West Lafayette elementary school students who’ve spent years lobbying lawmakers to honor a state insect just got a powerful ally.

Governor Eric Holcomb says he’ll join them in advocating for the Say’s Firefly once the 2018 legislative session starts in January.

IndyPolitcs.com

Today:  we revisit our conversation about the new (to Indiana) idea of a subscription fee to pay for medical care with Portage family practitioner Timothy Ames.  He switched from the traditional medical insurance route for being paid for his services to what is called "direct primary care."  Dr. Ames says this method's popular in other states.

A study committee’s proposed recommendations on short-term rentals through sites like Airbnb include broad policy statements for the General Assembly to consider next session. But the recommendations don’t include specific legislative language, and likely don’t change debate on the issue.

Legislation last session to bar local governments from banning short-term rentals failed to pass.

Indiana manufacturers hope the 2018 legislative session will hone in on workforce and education reforms to help fill jobs.

The state’s top business sector wants lawmakers to realign $1 billion in existing workforce spending and create incentives to attract new workers.