Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

The Federal Aviation Administration has ordered inspections of fan blades on some jet engines of the same type as the one that blew apart on a Southwest Airlines flight, causing the death of a passenger and injuring seven others.

Meanwhile, Philadelphia's medical examiner says Jennifer Riordan, who died on the Dallas-bound Boeing 737 flight, was killed by blunt trauma to her head, neck and torso when she was partially blown out a cabin window shattered by engine debris. Federal inspectors say Riordan, 43, was wearing a seatbelt at the time of the accident.

Former Playboy model Karen McDougal, who claims to have had a 10-month affair with President Trump that ended in 2007, has settled a lawsuit with the owner of the National Enquirer that kept her from publicly discussing the relationship.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET Friday

Facebook on Wednesday announced it is introducing "new privacy experiences" aimed at complying with European Union regulations that will give users worldwide a chance to opt out of some features that could expose their personal data.

"Everyone – no matter where they live – will be asked to review important information about how Facebook uses data and make choices about their privacy on Facebook," said Erin Egan, Facebook's chief privacy officer and Ashlie Beringer, deputy general counsel.

Russia said Wednesday that it has received word that the U.S. has no plans for further sanctions after confusion over the issue involving U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, who announced fresh sanctions only to be contradicted by the White House.

Russia's official TASS news agency quoted a source in the foreign ministry as confirming, "the United States has informed the Russian embassy that there will be no new sanctions for now."

Days after it was revealed that Fox News host Sean Hannity was a client of President Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, The Atlantic reports that the political commentator has employed at least two other lawyers with links to the president and who are also frequent guests on his show.

Updated at 6:55 a.m. ET

The Trump administration's cybersecurity coordinator, Rob Joyce, said Monday that he will leave his post — an announcement that comes just a week after the exit of his boss, Homeland Security Adviser Tom Bossert.

Demonstrators gathered in major cities across Iraq on Sunday to protest U.S.-led airstrikes against Syria in protests called for by Muqtada al-Sadr, the influential Shiite cleric who led the Mehdi Army that fought U.S. forces after the toppling of Saddam Hussein's regime in 2003.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is weighing a new round of economic sanctions against Russia for its backing of Syrian President Bashar al Assad's alleged use of chemical weapons.

The proposed sanctions follow U.S.-led airstrikes against Syria's chemical weapons capability and President Trump's promise that Assad and his allies, namely Moscow, would pay a "big price" for enabling the use of chemical weapons.

Updated at 6 a.m. ET

Former FBI Director James Comey says he believed that the investigation into whether Hillary Clinton sent or received classified email from a private server while she was secretary of state was a "no-win" case for him that would further polarize an already deeply divided electorate.

An aviation security official who was fired after dragging a passenger off a United Airlines flight in Chicago last year is suing the airline and his former employer, the Chicago Department of Aviation, charging that he was not adequately trained for such a situation.

James Long was called to the plane in April 2017 after a passenger, Dr. David Dao, refused to give up his seat to a United employee on the Chicago-Louisville, Ky., flight.

China has placed equipment designed to jam communications on a barren outpost in the South China Sea — a move apparently aimed at bolstering its dominance in a region where it has pushed extensive territorial claims with its maritime neighbors, The Wall Street Journal reports, quoting U.S. officials.

According to the newspaper:

Attorneys for Bill Cosby were expected Tuesday to portray a $3.4 million civil settlement with the comedian's accuser, Andrea Constand, as evidence of her greed.

On the first day of the retrial on Monday in Norristown, Pa., prosecutors revealed the previously secret settlement that Cosby, now 80, paid in 2006, two years after Constand alleges he drugged and sexually assaulted her at his home near Philadelphia. Cosby has denied the charges.

A previous trial last spring ended in a deadlocked jury.

The daughter of a Russian ex-spy, who was poisoned along with her father last month in southern England, was discharged from the hospital, according to medical officials.

Yulia Skripal, 33, was released on Monday, while her father, 66-year-old Sergei Skripal, is improving rapidly.

"Yulia has asked for privacy from the media and I want to reiterate her request," Christine Blanshard, deputy chief executive and medical director at Salisbury hospital said in a news conference on Tuesday.

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET

China's President Xi Jinping says his country will "significantly lower" import tariffs on automobiles as part of a broader move to open up its economy amid a major trade dispute with the U.S.

In a speech at the Boao Forum for Asia, a business forum held on China's southern Hainan island, Xi appeared to be aiming to show his country is a leader in promoting global free markets and to defuse trade tensions with Washington.

Colombian authorities have arrested a former peace negotiator for the rebel group FARC on a warrant seeking his extradition to the U.S. on cocaine smuggling charges.

Seuxis Hernandez, also known by the alias Jesus Santrich, was taken into custody at his residence in the capital, Bogota, on an arrest warrant issued by the U.S. District Court in the Southern District of New York charging him with conspiracy to smuggle $15 million worth of cocaine into the U.S., according to an Interpol notice quoted by The Associated Press.

Todd Brassner, a 67-year-old art dealer who died in a fire in Trump Tower over the weekend, had reportedly been trying to sell his 50th-floor apartment there since President Trump was elected, The New York Times reports.

Pyongyang has told Washington that it is ready to discuss the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula when North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Trump meet, a U.S. official has confirmed to NPR.

In direct contacts between U.S. and North Korean officials, the latter relayed to the Trump administration that Kim is willing to talk about the key sticking point in relations between the two countries, NPR's Michele Kelemen reported late Sunday.

As the U.S. and China ratchet up a tit-for-tat tariff dispute, it has been said often in the last few weeks: "No one wins a trade war."

Nevertheless, staying out of a war is often the best way to win, or at least not to lose.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

China is retaliating against the Trump administration's tariffs on Chinese goods, imposing charges of its own Monday on a list of 128 imports from the United States, including agricultural products ranging from fruit to wine to frozen pork.

China's tariffs add fuel to what many economists fear is a burgeoning trade war between the two economic superpowers.

Police say that the driver of a SUV carrying a family with several adopted children may have intentionally plunged off a cliff along California's scenic coast last month, according to local news reports.

The family from Woodland, Wash. — Sarah and Jennifer Hart, who were married, and at least three of the couple's six adopted children — was in the vehicle on California's scenic Highway 1 near the city of Westport when it accelerated rapidly off the cliff and fell 100 feet to the rocky shore.

A former FBI agent working on counterterrorism has been charged with sharing classified documents with a news organization, including documents that reportedly show that the bureau continues to use race and religion to profile potential targets.

Attorneys for Terry James Albury said in a statement that their client was "driven by a conscientious commitment to long-term national security and addressing the well-documented systemic biases within the FBI."

NATO has followed the lead of many of its member countries, expelling Russian diplomats in connection with the nerve agent poisoning of an ex-double agent Sergei Skripal in southern England earlier this month.

Moscow — which has suffered a major international backlash over the incident — called NATO's move "boorish" and insignificant, but nonetheless vowed to retaliate.

More than 20 countries on Monday announced expulsions of Russian diplomats in response to the attack on Skripal, 66, and his 33-year-old daughter, Yulia.

Joe Arpaio, the former Maricopa County sheriff who is running for U.S. Senate in Arizona, says that once elected, he will renew his quest to demonstrate that former President Barack Obama's birth certificate is a fake.

The nation's largest retailer has bounced Cosmopolitan from the coveted checkout aisle following a years-long campaign targeting the women's magazine for its "hyper-sexualized" covers and content.

Walmart said Tuesday that it was removing the magazine from checkout lines at its 5,000 stores across the country.

"Walmart will continue to offer Cosmopolitan to customers that wish to purchase the magazine, but it will no longer be in the checkout aisles," the company said in a statement. "While this was primarily a business decision, the concerns raised were heard."

Updated at 6:15 a.m. ET

Thousands of people gathered in the Siberian city of Kemerovo on Tuesday to express anger over a fire that killed at least 64 people, many of them children, as reports indicated that the building's alarm system had been shut off and exits blocked.

Reuters, citing a list of victims made available to relatives, said 41 of the dead were children, many of whom were apparently trapped in a locked movie theater.

Authorities now say that a student in Maryland who fatally shot a fellow classmate and seriously hurt another died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound during a confrontation with a school resource officer.

Initial reports suggested that Deputy First Class Blaine Gaskill, the resource officer at Great Mills High School, in Great Mills, Md., might have killed the shooter, 17-year-old Austin Rollins.

On Aug. 12, 1945, days after atomic bombs were dropped on Japan, the Donnors received an official telegram at their home in Big Rapids, Mich. Their son, U.S. Navy Radio Technician 2nd Class Clarence Donnor was missing in action, it said.

Although they did not know it at the time, Donnor had been listed aboard the USS Indianapolis, which had been sunk by a Japanese submarine in the Philippine Sea on July 30, resulting in the largest loss of life at sea in U.S. Navy history.

Updated at 4:54 p.m. ET

Major stock indexes around the world fell Friday amid continuing worries that the U.S. and China are about to enter into a trade war. The Dow Jones industrial average fell an additional 424 points, or about 1.8 percent, to 23,533, for a two-day drop totaling more than 1,100 points.

Stephen Paddock, the man who rained bullets down on a crowd of concertgoers last October, killing 58 people, appears in newly released surveillance video to be an ordinary hotel guest and casino patron in the days leading to the massacre.

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