Carrie Kahn

If the polls are right, Mexico's next president will be a veteran leftist for whom the third time may very well be the charm.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador is running for president once again. But this time around, it appears his populist message is striking a chord with Mexicans exasperated with disturbing levels of violence and corruption.

Polls now put López Obrador at least 15 points ahead of his nearest rival, Ricardo Anaya of the right-of-center National Action Party.

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As sexual harassment complaints mounted in the United States against powerful men in Hollywood, politics and the media, Mexico's entertainment industry largely remained silent.

At least, that was the case until a few weeks ago, when it appeared that the #MeToo Movement — Mexico edition — had arrived.

Candidates in Mexico's volatile presidential race are scrambling to distance themselves from the disgraced big-data firm Cambridge Analytica.

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This Sunday it's estimated that Americans will consume more than 200 million avocados. After all, what's a Super Bowl party without guacamole?

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More than two weeks after Hondurans went to the polls to elect a new president, there is still no official winner. The current president holds a slight lead, but officials have yet to declare him the winner amid allegations of widespread fraud. Here's NPR's Carrie Kahn.

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In south Texas, this was going to be one of the best years farmers had seen in a while. The cotton crop was projected to bring in record prices and even clear out many families' debts. But the massive rainfall, winds and a slow drying-out process from Harvey have left many farmers overwhelmed and worried.

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Cubans really thought that their long era of economic isolation from the United States was over.

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In Mexico, the race is on to save a small, gray porpoise that is on the brink of extinction. It's called the vaquita, which is Spanish for "small cow."

Scientists believe only 30 remain in the warm, shallow waters of the Gulf of California, between Baja California's peninsula and mainland Mexico — the only place they live in the world.

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Murder is on the rise in Mexico. Ten years after the government launched its war on drugs and sent the military to combat cartels, homicides are at levels not seen since the height of that offensive. The violence is widespread, but it remains most prevalent in a few hard-hit towns and cities.

Hugo del Angel says his city, Ecatepec, a sprawling, struggling suburb of nearly 2 million outside Mexico City, is definitely high on that list.

"It's probably one of the three most problematic in the whole country," he says.

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