Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

A drone flight and a lingering dry spell have exposed a previously unknown monument in Ireland's Boyne Valley, forgotten for thousands of years and long covered by crops — which, struggling to cope with a lengthy drought, finally revealed the ancient footprint.

Kandace Vallejo thought she knew Southwest Key Programs: a big nonprofit based in Austin, Texas. Runs a charter school. Works with youth.

And holds thousands of migrant children in facilities paid for by the U.S. government.

That was news.

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET Wednesday

Since early May, 2,342 children have been separated from their parents after crossing the Southern U.S. border, according to the Department of Homeland Security, as part of a new immigration strategy by the Trump administration that has prompted widespread outcry.

On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order reversing his policy of separating families — and replacing it with a policy of detaining entire families together, including children, but ignoring legal time limits on the detention of minors.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

With chants of "families united" and "free our children now," hundreds of people marched to the tent city in Tornillo, Texas, where children have been detained for immigration violations.

The Father's Day march near El Paso was primarily organized by Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas, who is also running for Senate against Ted Cruz. He says the march was the brainchild of Veronica Escobar, who is running to fill his seat in the House, as well as other community leaders.

A massive dust storm on Mars is threatening NASA's Opportunity rover, which has been conducting research on the Red Planet for well over a decade.

Where the rover sits, the dust storm has completely blotted out the sun, depriving Opportunity of solar power and cutting off communications with Earth.

NASA scientists believe the rover has fallen asleep to wait out the storm, and that when the dust storm dies down and sunlight returns, the rover will resume activity.

A proposal to divide California into three separate states will appear on the ballot in November, after an idiosyncratic, years-long quest by a venture capitalist.

The migrant rescue ship Aquarius, which was left stranded in the Mediterranean Sea after Italy and Malta closed their ports to it, is heading off on a three-day journey to Spain — with help from the same countries that turned it away.

After the ship rescued migrants off the coast of Libya over the weekend, Italy said it wanted the rest of Europe to take the passengers; Malta said this ship was clearly Italy's responsibility.

Dorothy Cotton, a leader in the civil rights movement who educated thousands of African-Americans about their rights and the power of organizing, has died at 88.

She died at a retirement community in Ithaca, N.Y., the Ithaca Journal reports. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference confirmed her death to the Associated Press.

The Supreme Court in the United Kingdom has rejected an attempt to overturn Northern Ireland's strict abortion limits — but a majority of the justices also say the current law is "deeply unsatisfactory" and violates human rights.

Northern Ireland — unlike every other part of the U.K. — criminalizes abortion except when a woman's life or health is in danger. There is no exception for rape or incest, or for situations in which a fetus is not expected to live.

Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission had challenged the law in court.

Updated at 3 a.m. ET

The California judge who prompted a national outcry after handing former Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner a six-month sentence for sexual assault has been recalled by voters in Santa Clara County.

With 43 percent of county precincts reporting, 59 percent of voters favored the recall of Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky, 41 percent opposed the recall, according to The Associated Press, who called the vote early Wednesday.

Originally, it was just a name — Olga Monsanto's name, to be precise.

Around the turn of the 20th century, she married a man named John Francis Queeny. He named his artificial sweetener company after her. And over decades, that company expanded from the sweetness business into agri-chemicals, where it began to dominate the industry.

Updated 3:03 p.m. ET

President Trump has pardoned conservative commentator Dinesh D'Souza, who pleaded guilty in 2014 to making illegal campaign contributions in other people's names.

On Twitter on Thursday, Trump said D'Souza was "treated very unfairly by our government."

Updated at 3:26 p.m. ET

Prosecutors have dropped one felony charge against Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens, who will be will be resigning on Friday amid scandals about alleged misbehavior on the campaign trail and in the bedroom.

The governor's resignation was the result of a deal with prosecutors, who agreed to drop the charge if Greitens stepped down, St. Louis Public Radio reports.

The White House says it will impose a 25 percent tariff on $50 billion of Chinese goods with "industrially significant technology." The full list of products affected will be announced by June 15, and the tariffs will be implemented "shortly thereafter," according to the administration.

Updated 11:22 p.m. ET

President Trump's abrupt announcement he was calling off a June 12 summit with North Korea's leader was met Friday with an open invitation from North Korea to meet "at any time."

Trump's decision, which officials said Thursday was delivered in a letter directed to Kim Jong Un, prompted questions and dismay from world leaders.

A Washington state court of appeals has rejected a conspiracy theorist's attempt to acquire photos of the death scene of Kurt Cobain, the beloved Nirvana frontman who killed himself in 1994.

Richard Lee, who has spent years trying to prove that Cobain was murdered, has repeatedly asked the city of Seattle for access to the photos.

Someone appears to be producing a banned ozone-depleting chemical, interfering with the recovery of Earth's damaged ozone layer, according to a newly published study led by scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The illicit emissions are believed to be coming from somewhere in eastern Asia, but nothing else is known about the offender. It's a scientific whodunit — or rather, a who's-doing-it.

Uber riders who experience sexual harassment or assault will now be able to take their claims to court, instead of being forced into private arbitration, the ride-hailing app announced Tuesday.

Uber, like many companies, has a clause in its user agreement — and its employment contract — that requires a person to waive his or her constitutional right to take Uber to court. Instead, disputes are taken before a private third-party arbitrator, who is paid by the company.

James Harrison, an Australian man whose blood contains a rare antibody that can create a treatment that saves babies' lives, has donated plasma one last time.

Harrison, 81, is now over the age limit for donors — in fact, he hit the cap months ago.

But the Australian Red Cross Blood Service let him donate one last time on Friday. The service estimates that over the course of his life, he has helped save some 2.4 million babies.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

Retired Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North, infamous for his involvement in the Iran-Contra scandal in the 1980s, will be the next president of the National Rifle Association, the organization says in a statement.

A pair of suicide bombings on Tuesday killed more than two dozen people worshipping at a mosque in the small town of Mubi, in northeastern Nigeria.

Dozens more were injured in the attack, which came just one day after Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari made a state visit to the U.S.

Police put the death toll at 28, The Associated Press reports, but local hospital officials and rescue workers tell Agence France-Presse that the total could be far higher.

A coalition of 17 states and the District of Columbia, led by California, is suing the Environmental Protection Agency over its plan to change vehicle efficiency standards. The states are asking a court to review the EPA's proposed actions, arguing that they violate the Clean Air Act.

"We're not looking to pick a fight with the Trump administration, but when the stakes are this high for our families' health and our economic prosperity, we have a responsibility to do what is necessary to defend them," California's attorney general, Xavier Becerra, said.

The official autopsy of Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man shot and killed by Sacramento, Calif., police in March, found that he was shot fewer times, and fewer times in the back, than a private autopsy had concluded.

An autopsy commissioned by Clark's family found that Clark was shot eight times, with at least six shots in the back, contradicting police officers' account that Clark had approached them.

The coroner's office, in a report released Tuesday, found he was shot seven times, three times in the back, in a manner consistent with the police account.

The Boy Scouts program is becoming Scouts BSA in February 2019 to reflect the decision to include young women, the Boy Scouts of America announced on Wednesday.

The organization's name will remain the same; only the program for older youth will change its name.

Updated at 3:07 p.m. ET

T-Mobile and Sprint have reached a "definitive agreement" to merge in an all-stock deal, which would create a new company with a total value of $146 billion, based on current stock prices.

International chemical weapons inspectors have not yet managed to enter the Syrian town of Douma — and it's not clear when they will be able to visit the town, which was the site of a suspected chemical weapons attack on April 7.

Syria and its ally Russia had invited inspectors with the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons to visit the town, but then were accused of blocking them from accessing it for several days. Then Syrian state media claimed on Tuesday that the inspectors had entered the town.

But on Wednesday, OPCW said that's not what happened.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

Starbucks is closing thousands of stores across the U.S. on the afternoon of May 29 to conduct "racial-bias education geared toward preventing discrimination in our stores," the company said in a statement.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET Wednesday

New York City has removed a statue of J. Marion Sims, a 19th-century gynecologist who experimented on enslaved women, from a pedestal in Central Park.

The statue will be moved to a cemetery in Brooklyn where Sims, sometimes called the "father of gynecology," is buried. A new informational plaque will be added both to the empty pedestal and the relocated statue, and the city is commissioning new artwork to reflect the issues raised by Sims' legacy.

Updated at 3:47 p.m. ET

According to Syrian state media, a team of inspectors from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has entered the town of Douma, the site of a suspected chemical weapons attack earlier this month.

The OPCW would not confirm whether its inspectors had arrived in the city, telling NPR's Ruth Sherlock that it doesn't "discuss operational details." A spokeswoman for the State Department said that the U.S. believes that the OPCW team has not yet entered Douma.

After a series of hospitalizations, former first lady Barbara Bush, 92, is focused on "comfort care," according to a statement released by the office of George H.W. Bush.

Bush is the wife of former President George H. W. Bush, and the mother of former President George W. Bush. She established the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy decades ago, promoting reading skills across America, particularly for young children.

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